Blog

Blog

PRAXIS: Blog

Throughout the 2017 National Architecture Conference, delegates Dr Helen Norrie (University of Tasmania) and Michael Smith (The Red and Black Architect) will be bringing the conversations from the stage to the digital realm, right here on the PRAXIS: Blog.

You can also follow the action on Twitter via @Praxis2017 and #Praxis2017

 
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Day three

    May 8, 2017

    By Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect

    The final day of the 2017 National Architecture Conference began with Vietnamese architect Vo Trong Nghia presenting two areas of exploration. Firstly a body of work exploring the integration of vegetation with buildings and a secondly a selection of projects that explore the possibilities of bamboo in contemporary structures. As excellent as Nghia’s work was, his talk was unfortunately very similar in content to his 2014 presentation at the Institute’s National Conference in Perth.

    Next up was the lightening speed session with Huw Turner and Penny Collins of Collins and Turner, Emma Williamson of CODA, John Wardle of John Wardle Architects and Neil Durbach of Durbach Block Jaggers. This session had a clear focus on how collaborations occur which was clearly missing from the equivalent session from the previous day.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Wrap-up of the 2017 conference

    May 6, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania and Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect

    Helen and Michael share their final thoughts at the close of the 2017 National Architecture Conference: PRAXIS.

    Thank you for following along with the blog.

    Listen now.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Helen Norrie and Michael Smith in conversation

    May 6, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania and Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect
    Delegates Helen Norrie and Michael Smith discuss one of the highlights from day two of presentations – Rahul Mehrotra.

    Listen now.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: short, sharp shocks

    May 6, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania

    After both of the morning keynote talks a host of local practices presented short 8 minute insights into their practices. On day one, Megan Baynes from Room 11, in Tasmania, a place she describes as ‘tragic, mad but never boring,’ talked about projects that connect to place through clear diagrammatic gestures that underpin tactile, robust and subtle ordering of the environment. Rachel Nolan and Patrick Kennedy considered how memories are evoked through practice, through light, colour, texture, scale, form and smell, grounding people and building to place and time. Resisting his usual urge to run rapid fire through an array of ingenious and delightful projects, Rodney Eggleston talked about March Studio’s unsuccessful entry for the 2016 National Gallery of Victoria Pavilion competition.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Helen Norrie and Michael Smith in conversation

    May 6, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania and Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect

    Delegates Helen Norrie and Michael Smith sum up the highlights of day one of presentations: Winy Maas, Megan Baynes, Rachel Nolan and Patrick Kennedy, Rodney Eggleston, Super Session, Eva Castro and Glenn Murcutt.

    Listen now…

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Announcement of the National President’s Prize

    May 6, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania

    Professor Michael Keniger has been awarded the 2017 Australian Institute of Architects President’s Prize, an acknowledgement of his incredible contribution to promoting the architectural profession in general, and actively supporting the careers of others. Arriving in Brisbane in the 1980s after establishing his career working for Norman Foster and teaching at the Architectural Association in London, Mick became a great mentor for several generations of students and staff at the University of Queensland School of Architecture. Moving from practice to academia, Mick was keen to explore how to ‘leverage his role in academia to assist the profession.’ He went about this in many ways, fostering a new wave of talent, and devising ways to lift their practice trajectory from the usual small practice domain of ‘decks and dunnies’ into a more diverse portfolio of commercial and public buildings. Fostering partnerships between emerging and establish practices, and ensuring that lesser known but highly capable small practices were considered for larger public buildings, created a clear shift in procurement practices.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: Day two wrap-up

    May 6, 2017

    By Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect

    Welcome to the highlights of the second day of the Australian Institute of Architects’ annual conference.

    The theme of this years conference is ‘PRAXIS: Process. Propositions. Production’. But what is Praxis anyway? There are a few variants out there but here’s the conference definition:

    Praxis: the process by which a theory, lesson, or skill is enacted.

    Kicking off the day’s proceedings was a warm welcome to country by Gadigal Elder, Uncle Chicka Madden. This was followed by Institute President Ken Maher and then Institute Chief Executive Officer Jennifer Cunich. Cunich spoke of an ambitious process of change within the institute, to re-position it as an agile, outward facing organisation, leading the way in advocating for architects and the built environment.

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    PRAXIS: kicking off and kicking back 1

    May 5, 2017

    By Dr Helen Norrie, University of Tasmania

    It’s always great to be back amidst the sea of familiar ageing faces that is the National Architecture Conference.  Following a very laid back, but lush, evening at the Argyle Hotel last night  the conference got off to  flying start with Winy Mass of MVRDV subtly but surely subverting Rem Koolhaas’ SMLXL manifesto through the consideration of ideas beyond both ends of the spectrum. His presentation started within XXL, with hyperthetical ideas of a ‘hyper optimised world’ explored though diagrammatic analysis and speculation on  global issues and interactions.  
     
    Maas continued through to the XL register with a discussion of ‘Porouscity’ via an exploration of LEGO parametrics. The analogue medium of actual LEGO blocks was employed to develop a series of distortions of the prototypical highrise tower, with ‘stretched out arms’ and created hollowed and stepped forms that sought to stretch the relationship between inside and out.  These ‘pre-scripted’ ideas were then expanded through digital parametric models, to create semi-realistic ideas for high-rises. 

    Continue reading
  • AIA logo

    Day One – PRAXIS: Fringe

    May 5, 2017

    By Michael Smith, The Red and Black Architect

    Architecture Christmas has once again arrived with the annual Australian Institute of Architects Conference kicking off for another year. This year it is Sydney’s turn to host the gathering of over 1000 architects from across the nation. From an outsider’s perspective, it would appear that Sydney is currently a hotbed of built environment issues. From the incredibly expensive and divisive Westconnex toll road, through to a housing affordability crisis, and serious question marks around public spaces and the public interest in sites such as Barangaroo.

    Perhaps there is no place better to start the daily coverage on the 2017 conference than with the building which defines Sydney, The Sydney Opera House. As a fringe event for the conference, delegates could choose to visit one of the most iconic buildings ever built, and experience a living breathing documentary of the history, tectonics, politics and media surrounding Jorn Utzon’s masterpiece.

    Continue reading

 
All views expressed on this blog are those of the author/s and not the Australian Institute of Architects. The Institute does not endorse The Red and Black Architect and its associated blog theredandblackarchitect.com. All content is solely created by the respective author.