2006 COLORBOND® steel Student Biennale

The 2006 Student Biennale received 142 applications from 15 Australian universities.

Joint Winner
Alistair Dickinson Institial Landscapes: Working the Terrain Vague of Perth – Curtin University of Technology
Michael Spooner Playground: A Manifesto for Giants – RMIT University
Steven Swan Co-rational Design and Investigations into the Potential of Mathematical Equations – RMIT University
Commendations
Elena Svistounova Vnukovo Orphanage – University of Adelaide
Finalists
Michelle Blakely Lot 178 Arts Education Centre – University of Western Australia
Jonathan Chua Diagonal Courtyard House – University of Western Australia
Aimee Goodwin Yun Yang Buddhist Temple – The University of Melbourne
Tracee Lim The Earth as Monument – The Merging of Object and Field – University of New South Wales
Alan McLean National Archive of Australia – The University of Melbourne
Wei Song Justice Complex – Curtin University of Technology
Joint Winner

Alistair Dickinson,
Curtin University of Technology

Ross Slip Shipwright School

Institial Landscapes: Working the Terrain Vague of Perth

Project Statement

Interstitial Landscapes: Working the Terrain Vague of Perth is a proposition of a working method with the clear intention of activating the terrain vague of Perth in a way that enriches the urban experience for the city’s inhabitants through architectural intervention.

These architectural interventions do not set out to erase the terrain vague, through a process of ‘gentrification’, but nurture and expose the true nature of these spaces providing new grounds for an alternative way of experiencing the city.

This alternative urban experience may be constructed in a way that operates free from the highly regulated homogeneity of the productive city.

Jury Report

Revisiting the lost spaces of the city – the terrain vague – Dickinson provides a poetic proposition of the small acts of daily life. His study is a recognition of the other public spaces of the city, and their role and worth.

Good critical analysis of the minutae of time and circumstance and the use of confined space is evident. This project demonstrates the value of careful observation and thoughtful response to urban experiences.

 2006 Joint Winner: Institial Landscapes: Working the Terrain Vague of Perth by Daniel Griffin by Alistair Dickinson

2006 Joint Winner: Institial Landscapes: Working the Terrain Vague of Perth by Daniel Griffin by Alistair Dickinson

 


Michael Spooner ,
UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA

Playground: A Manifesto for Giants

Project Statement

The architectural response of Gay Sauna/Library, is located in Melbourne’s ‘playground’ suburb of St Kilda, on a site adjacent to the notorious ‘Palace’ and historic ‘Palais’, and Melbourne’s most apparent carnival manifestation Luna Park. The car park site has been highlighted in the council’s proposed foreshore redevelopment plan as a key focus of any urban initiative.

Initially drawn through the texts of John Huzinga and his social critique of Man the Player, and Mikhail Bahktin’s tracing of carnival culture in the literary work of 16th Century writer Rabelais, the project endeavoured to read beneath the limited everyday understanding of play.

Jury Report

Putting a mirror up to St Kilda, sexual isolation and reinvention, and the curious symbolism of Luna Park, Spooner takes us on an intense and highly personal journey. In this, he analyses the nature of play and of homicide, lust and gluttony.

He shows a critical engagement with the place, acknowledging its gutsy fragmentation (its ‘St Kildaness’), now under threat from authority homogeneity.

This is a design that defends the place of otherness and excess, providing an exotic locale and momentos within a ‘big dipper’ framework.

It lifts the lid on another world, and the approach is courageous, imaginative, inventive, subversive.

2006 Joint Winner: Playground: A Manifesto for Giants by Michael Spooner

2006 Joint Winner: Playground: A Manifesto for Giants by Michael Spooner


Steven Swain ,
RMIT University

Co-rational Design and Investigations into the Potential of Mathematical Equations

Project Statement

This research project investigates the potential of mathematics as a design technique and tool. The mathematical equation was used to facilitate co-rational design and a more fluid and dynamic collaboration process between the engineer and architect. A number of building types and programs were explored including the Hybrid Cathedral, which proposed a single mathematically derived surface mediating between a soaring sacred space of monumental at the heart and multilevel apartment nestled in the sinuous periphery. The Inhabitable Bridge across Corio Bay explored the simplicity of the three line equation in creating a form of great spatial and programmatic complexity.

Jury Report

Enjoying the freedom of an ‘ocean’ site, the design starts from a mathematical and engineering base, and uses contemporary technologies of representation, with an important collaborative result. The approach and images generate excitement for the future, and a user-friendly outcome to 21st century development pressures.

The particular concepts, while nominally responding to the specifics of the Corio Bay site, have a more universal application allowing flexibility and diversity.

A remarkable presentation explaining how possibilities emerge through a vigorous process to potentially exciting results.

2006 Joint Winner: Co-rational Design and Investigations into the Potential of Mathematical Equations by Steven Swain

2006 Joint Winner: Co-rational Design and Investigations into the Potential of Mathematical Equations by Steven Swain

Commendation

Elena Svistounova,
University of Adelaide

Vnukovo Orphanage

Project Statement

The Vnukovo Orphanage is a projected refuge for homeless children in Post-Soviet Russia. Occupying an idyllic wooded site adjacent the village of Vnukovo, near Moscow, the conventionally built wooden architecture is constructed on an unconventional plan that gently confounds institutional norms. Through attention to the experiences of scale, texture, colour, form and light, the scheme explores ideas of growth, rehabilitation and rethinking that will help children harmed by alienating experiences on the streets to adapt to a more secure and settled life. The developmental and healing nature of play is also broadly interpreted as an essential principle of the scheme.

Jury Report

A scheme for an orphanage which responds to the child in need, and a healing process through design. A thoughtful humane response, linked to the ideal of the intimacy of Russian village life, and nominally to the Russian vernacular tradition.

The concept moves away from typical institutional models, and responds to the healing and developmental potential of play. The project would benefit from a greater critical engagement in the evolution of new designs from vernacular models.

2006 Commendation: Vnukovo Orphanage by Elena Svistounova

2006 Commendation: Vnukovo Orphanage by Elena Svistounova

Finalist

Michelle Blakely,
University of Western Australia

Lot 178 Arts Education Centre

Project Statement

The location is a remnant gold mining town 90kms north of Kalgoorlie. The remote and arid desert conditions require a robust, durable, low maintenance infrastructure. The Centre’s education programme provides workspaces and short-stay, accommodation for city students, as well as studios and accommodation for an artists-in-residence programme, a public gallery, administration offices and accommodation for a manager.

The project tests the theoretical notions of architecture as an enabler of the event of transition, particularly in the relationships of interior and exterior, light and shadow, urban and rural, built and unbuilt, past and present.

Jury Report

The design gains strength from its long horizontal forms, strong shadows and colour.  Its simplicity is appropriate in this spare and arid landscape.  On closer inspection the initial impression is not fulfilled in the detail.

2006 Finalist: Lot 178 Arts Education Centre by Michelle Blakely

2006 Finalist: Lot 178 Arts Education Centre by Michelle Blakely


Jonathan Chua,
University of Western Australia

Diagonal Courtyard House

Project Statement

The project seeks the reworking of the rowhouse typology on the Australian Fine China (AFC) site in Subiaco, Western Australia, as part of its master plan to increase the range of high density housing types to achieve a mixed residential and commercial / retail development, in line with sustainability principles.

Jury Report

A design for town houses in the ‘shop-house’ tradition, it seeks to introduce controlled sunlight into interiors through clever re-arrangements of plan and section, detailed consideration of orientation, and the use of louvres.

A clever idea worthy of more rigorous exploration.

2006 Finalist: Diagonal Courtyard House by Jonathan Chua

2006 Finalist: Diagonal Courtyard House by Jonathan Chua


Aimee Goodwin,
The University of Melbourne

Yun Yang Buddhist Temple

Project Statement

The brief was to re-design a Chinese Buddhist temple complex in suburban Melbourne.  The program included a temple, gallery, meditation hall, multi-function hall, administration and dormitories for the resident monks and nuns with accommodation for guests.

The objective was to advance Buddhism in the local and wider communities.  Traditional Buddhist architecture could not be transplanted onto the site and hold the same significance and relevance in a new locality, culture and time.  Instead the brief called for an investigation into traditional Chinese design principles and how they could be utilised to translate Buddhist ideologies into the Australian context.

Jury Report

The design is for a place of sanctuary and meditation in a generous landscape setting.

Exquisite pencil drawings evoke a particular mood, intimacy and place.  There is an appropriate emphasis on the journey, but limited architectural expression.

2006 Finalist: Yun Yang Buddhist Temple by Aimee Goodwin

2006 Finalist: Yun Yang Buddhist Temple by Aimee Goodwin


Tracee Lim,
University Of New South Wales

The Earth as Monument – The Merging of Object and Field

Project Statement

With the notion of viewing Sydney land formation as sculptured (constructed) terrain, the idea of a “Hybrid Sculptural Museum” is being proposed, transforming the perception of a conventional museum to a hybridisation museum, integrating with existing site programs: The Domain Carpark + The Domain Park and Royal Botanical Gardens + Art Gallery of New South Wales = (Clients)

Main programs are outdoor and indoor sculpture museum, an extension to the existing Art Gallery of New South Wales. Integration with existing Domain Carpark and The Domain Park programs facilitate art viewing in a different perception. Therefore proposed reconfiguration of programs serves as an information centre for art related activities – first point access for Sydney Sculptural Walk.

Jury Report

A complex and potentially controversial project involving an important, poorly amended Sydney park landscape and the adaption of a large existing concrete car park bunker all linked with the existing Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Beautifully presented and rendered, but the graphics and complexity inhibit the architectural outcome.  The key architectural proposition of the marrying of the architecture and the terrain is not explained from the key public places.

2006 Finalist: The Earth as Monument - The Merging of Object and Field by Tracee Lim

2006 Finalist: The Earth as Monument – The Merging of Object and Field by Tracee Lim


Alan McLean,

The University of Melbourne

National Archive of Australia

Project Statement

The New National Archive was designed for the Parliamentary Triangle of Canberra, abutting Lake Burley Griffin.  The retention, preservation, and exhibition of relevant national documents are of prime importance to the heritage of Australia.

The private archival functions to the brief include storage, preservation, and conservation, contained within insitu concrete containers.

The public functions include exhibition, theatre, research, and search rooms, contained within 4 glass containers around a central brick void.

The Archive reflects the symbolic importance of its task as a cultural treasury, whilst understanding the historic and contextual nature of the program and site.

Jury Report

A proposal for the original National Archives site on Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra.  Competent images and arrangements, but unrealised potential in the monumentality of the project.  A bold simple project, yet the circulation lacks clear explanation.

2006 Finalist: National Archive of Australia by Alan McLean

2006 Finalist: National Archive of Australia by Alan McLean


Wei Song ,

Curtin University of Technology

Justice Complex

Project Statement

The new Supreme Court complex is sited within Stirling Gardens and sits along a North-South axis which connects the portico of the Old Supreme Court with St Georges Terrace.  The building comprises three major parts:

  1. The northern ‘office’ end containing the courtrooms; Magistrates, Children’s and Jury Court.
  2. The southern ‘frayed’ garden end, which houses the custody, magistrates and library spaces.  It gestures towards the old Supreme Court, and ultimately merges with the garden.
  3. Between these end conditions is the intense placing of secure circulation which brings the magistrate, those in custody and the public into close proximity.

Jury Report

A new court house on a sensitive site in central Perth, the presentation has a very high standard of montage, and evocative sketches and models.

The planning is not clearly explained, and does not demonstrate a thorough understanding of the workings of a court.

2006 Finalist: Justice Complex by Wei Song

2006 Finalist: Justice Complex by Wei Song